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TRAINING YOUR NEW PUPPY

It is important to start training your new puppy as soon as you bring him home. The quickest and easiest way to train your puppy is to rely on his natural instincts and behavior. There are two types of training: behavioral and obedience.

Behavioral training is best done on a one on one basis. This type of training corrects bad habits your dog may have developed, such as jumping, car chasing, begging, climbing on furniture and chewing.

Obedience training should be frequent and short, so as not to bore your puppy. Two to three times a day would be sufficient to keep the puppy’s attention. It is best to train your dog just before meals so he associates his meal with a reward for the training.

In order to prepare your puppy for a well-trained, well socialized adult life you must keep him safe from hazards just as you would a child. Many new puppies are injured or harmed because their owners are not aware of their habits or how curious they are.

Many people feel it is cruel to crate a puppy or dog. A crate is any container, made of wire mesh or plastic that will hold the puppy comfortably, with enough room to stand or to curl up and sleep. The crate can be used for:

  • Housetraining
  • Protection from excited toddlers
  • Playpen for puppies when you’re not home
  • Sanctuary for the over-excited pup

If you expect your puppy to sleep in a dog bed or crate, make sure you enforce that behavior from day one.

Everything you do with a puppy from the time you get him at eight weeks can have an effect on what the dog will be like as an adult. If you can understand the patterns and rules dogs live by, then you can better relate to him and teach him to abide by your codes. Anthropomorphizing is something most of us do with animals - we give them human traits and explanations. A puppy can never think like a human - therefore it is quite reasonable for his owner to try to think like a dog.

All your dealings with your dog should be from a position of authority, or ALPHA. To get your dog’s attention bring a treat to the dog’s nose. Say his name and then say "watch me" while you glide the treat to the bridge of your nose between your eyes. As the dog looks at your eyes (the treat), praise him and give him the treat before he looks away.

Every time a dog does something, he reinforces to himself that he can do it. Housebreaking is simply teaching the dog that he cannot empty himself in your home. If you see him begin to pee or poop inside, hustle over to him, softly say "no", pick him up and rush him out the door and praise him when he finishes outside.

Teach your puppy to play with his toys. Let him know how happy you are and how good he is when he chews them. Then, when you see him chewing your furniture, firmly tell him "off!" and immediately show him one of his own toys. Encourage him to play with and chew on it, and praise him profusely when he does.

To correct jumping, gently and repetitively place puppy’s feet back on the floor and reward him there. Be consistent. To prevent jumping, get down to your puppy’s level to give affection and attention. Do not pet, talk, cuddle or reward him when he jumps. Do not allow other people to let him jump on them.

Many people try to win their new puppy’s love by letting the puppy always have his way. Like children, puppies are little sponges. They soak up everything around them, so they’re actively learning during every second of their existence. You can either use that to your advantage or let the puppy learn a lot of stuff you’d rather he didn’t.

Article written by:
Astrid Bullen
Astrid is a freelance writer and cat-owner. Visit her at http://cyberesources.com



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