Lucy, the Wonder Dog

About UsFree ProductsSpecial Offers
Pet Supplies
Search the Store

AGILITY & SPORTS
ANXIETY & STRESS
ARTICLES
BEDS & DOG HOUSES
BOWLS & FEEDERS
CATS
CLEAN-UP
DEARLY DEPARTED
DENTAL
EAR CARE
FLEA & TICK
FOOD
GROOMING
HOUSETRAINING
JOINT CARE
LEASHES
NEWSLETTER
SAMPLE SALE
SHAMPOO
SKIN & COAT
SUPPLEMENTS
TOYS
TRAINING HELP
TRAVEL PETS
TREATS
WEARABLES

Go HOME

SpecialsTell a Friend!

Email Us

 

Search Dog Books:
In Association with Amazon.com


DOG ADOPTION TIPS I LEARNED FROM MY DOGS

There’s a hole in your life that only a dog can fill. You want a special dog, perhaps just a full-grown adult. Maybe your code of ethics calls for saving a dog’s life ­ not buying an expensive purebred.

I’m not a veterinarian or a dog trainer, but I’ve enjoyed two successful adoptions. Here are some tips I’ve picked up along the way.

(1) Clarify your requirements ahead of time.

Once you’re standing in front of a cage, it’s easy to say, "Well, he’s a lot bigger than I expected, and I really wanted a female, but oh he’s SO cute!" No amount of love or training will help if your dog needs more exercise than you can provide.

(2) Know the difference between shelter and rescue groups.

Most cities have humane societies where you can view dogs and make a choice. Rescue groups typically hold animals in foster care ­ which is good, because you can ask the foster mom all sorts of questions. For example, they can say, "This dog lived with two cats so you know you can trust her."

(3) Be prepared to pay.

Shelter animals are not free, but you do get value for money. Expect to pay a fee that may include spay/neuter costs, licensing, and/or veterinarian visits.

(4) Consider an older dog.

By the time a dog has turned three or four, she’s as big as she’s going to get. No surprises! You’ll also have clues regarding his temperament.

(5) Plan to confine the dog during a period of transition.

Your new dog doesn’t get it. She was in a loving home (or left alone in a yard all day or even abused). Then she spent a few weeks in a cage, feeling lonely and isolated. Maybe she’s been passed around to multiple homes.

Bottom line, she’s stressed. She may chew, dig, bark, or even lose her house training at first.

Crating the dog prevents destructive behavior. My dogs both looked visibly relieved as they retreated to their crates every day. "Time to relax," they seemed to say.

(6) Invest in training.

Most dogs are turned over to the shelter because of behavior problems. If you’re new to the world of dog behavior, take a class or hire a professional. Most behavior can be corrected, even among older dogs. But if you’re not sure, ask a professional. Some behaviors can’t be “fixed.”

(7) Incorporate large doses of exercise and walks into your day.

Walking together builds your bond and a tired dog is a good dog. Begin the exercise program immediately so you can gain a sense of how much exercise the dog needs ­ an important factor in the dog’s adjustment ­ and start training for the basics on the way home from the shelter.

About The Author: Cathy Goodwin, a certfified Dog Fanatic, wrote Arf! Dog Health Comes Home: tips and resources to care for your aging, sick or injured dog. Download from http://www.dog-health.org


Random Banner

Terms of Use   |   Tell A Friend About This Site